Recent Posts

Copycat Dukkah

Copycat Dukkah

Avocado tartine topped with a 7-minute egg and a generous sprinkle of dukkah. Drool! After a Saturday morning brunch at Vif, a local Seattle cafe and bar in the Fremont neighborhood, I knew I had to recreate their amazingly flavorful dukkah. Not to mention, dukkah […]

Low FODMAP Trail Mix

Low FODMAP Trail Mix

Looking for a low FODMAP snack to satisfy those afternoon munchies? Check out this salty and sweet trail mix inspired by one of my favorite packaged snacks – FODY Foods Mockingbird Mix! I don’t know about you, but every afternoon, without fail, I get the […]

Why I Love Canned Tomatoes!

Why I Love Canned Tomatoes!

Did you know it’s American Heart Month AND Canned Food Month? That makes it the perfect time to talk about one of my favorite and most versatile canned foods – tomatoes! Whole, diced, fire-roasted…the tomato possibilities (tomatobilities?) are endless!

Why eat tomatoes?

  • Tomatoes contain an antioxidant called lycopene, which helps protect our cells and may help prevent some cancers. Even better, when tomatoes are cooked (or canned), our bodies can more easily absorb the lycopene.
  • Tomatoes are packed with vitamin C! Vitamin C is important for a healthy immune system; keeping your cartilage, bones, teeth, and skin in top condition; helping your body absorb iron and folate; and it also may help prevent cancer and heart disease.
  • Tomatoes are a good source of potassium, which is an important nutrient in keeping our blood pressure in check. A healthy blood pressure is a key component to keeping our hearts happy!
  • They can brighten up any dish! I can’t tell you the number of recipes that I’ve made that have been instantly improved by the addition of tomatoes. The citrus can add that punch of flavor you need!

Canned vs Fresh

  • Eating tomatoes canned is a great way to enjoy them year-round! Although you can find fresh tomatoes in your grocery store year-round, tomatoes aren’t in season year-round.
  • If tomatoes aren’t in season, then the fresh tomatoes that you see have likely traveled a ways to get to you and are going to be more expensive and not as fresh. Canned tomatoes are very affordable!
  • Vegetables and fruit, including tomatoes, are typically canned at peak-ripeness, which means peak-nutrition and best flavor! Fresh tomatoes are also delicious and nutritious; however, during the time that it takes to ship the tomatoes to the store and then the time that they sit on the shelf at the grocery store and again sit on your counter at home, they are losing nutrients.
  • Canned tomatoes have a long shelf-life, so you can keep a stock on hand to whip up a quick meal or snack on the fly.

Tips When Choosing Canned Tomatoes

  • Go for canned tomatoes that are packed in 100% juice or their own juices. This decreases any additional added salt or sugar.
  • Look for cans without any added salt. These should be labeled “no salt added” or “low sodium.” Don’t be fooled by the phrase “reduced sodium,” as these may not be sodium-free or even low sodium.
  • The cans you choose should be free from damage, such as dents, bulges, and cracks. This can be a sign of the bacteria that causes botulism, which is a serious health concern. Thankfully, this is very uncommon in commercially canned goods!
  • Check out more tips here for storing and using canned foods!

Recipes

Check out some delish recipes below that utilize canned tomatoes!

Want to learn more? Click here to visit Tomato Wellness!

Maple Cinnamon Pecan Butter

Maple Cinnamon Pecan Butter

On my last annual trip to visit family in Petersburg, Alaska, I got to experience the delightful little pop-up farmer’s market with produce from the local (“off the grid”) Farragut Farm. I purchased a small bag of snap peas and a jar of pecan butter to […]

Vegan Dark Chocolate Antioxidant Pudding

Vegan Dark Chocolate Antioxidant Pudding

Looking for a quick and delish Valentine’s Day dessert? Whip up this decadent vegan pudding in less than 5 minutes! Not only is this pudding delicious, but you also get a punch of antioxidants from the cocoa powder, goji berries, and cacao nibs – triple threat! […]

Low FODMAP Eleven Madison Park Granola

Low FODMAP Eleven Madison Park Granola

This quick and easy granola makes for a decadent Greek yogurt topping (make it plain because this granola provides plenty of sweetness!) or a savored gift when packed in a mason jar and tied with ribbon. You can also use it as a crunchy chia seed pudding topping, stir it into your pancake mix, or even use it as an oatmeal topper. The possibilities are endless! Comment below to let me know how you like to enjoy your granola!

Adapted from the granola recipe that is gifted guests of the Eleven Madison Park restaurant in Manhattan, this granola can be enjoyed by my low FODMAP friends, as well as anyone else! A simple swap of pecans for pistachios and dried cranberries for dried cherries and we’re there! I also decreased the salt and sugar amounts for this dietitian’s taste buds. Feel free to experiment with different nuts, seeds, and dried fruit to customize it to your liking!

This is not a low calorie, low sugar, or low fat granola, but boy is it tasty! As we dietitians like to say, “everything in moderation.” Keep that portion size in check and crunch away!


Print Recipe
Low FODMAP Eleven Madison Park Granola
With just a few simple swaps, I converted this delish granola recipe into one that's FODMAP friendly!
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35-40 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35-40 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 300 F.
  2. Combine oats, pecans, coconut, pumpkin seeds, and salt in a large bowl.
  3. In a small saucepan, combine brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil. Whisk over low heat until sugar has dissolved.
  4. Pour sugar mixture over oat mixture. Stir to combine. Oat mixture should be evenly coated with sugar mixture.
  5. Spread granola on a rimmed baking sheet, lined with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. Bake until granola is dry and golden brown, about 35-40 minutes. Stir several times during baking.
  6. Remove from oven and let cool. Add dried craisins. Store in an airtight container.
Recipe Notes

NUTRITION PER 1/4 CUP: 195 calories, 10g total fat, 2.5g saturated fat, 0mg cholesterol, 65mg sodium, 24g carbohydrate, 3.5g fiber, 9.5g sugar, 4g protein, 149mg potassium, 125mg phosphorus

 

Recipe adapted from Eleven Madison Park Granola

New Year’s Recipe Round Up

New Year’s Recipe Round Up

It’s that time of the year! Resolutions are made, plans are put into action, new diets are started… Instead of hopping on a new diet, start out the new year with these 15 Dietitian-created recipes! Healthy Chicken Pot Pie with Biscuits via Meals with Maggie […]

Morning Glory Breakfast Cookies

Morning Glory Breakfast Cookies

Cookies for breakfast? That’s right! Packed with nutrients, these no-sugar-added cookies make a great breakfast or pre-workout snack. The protein from the pecans and hemp seeds will help keep you full and the carbohydrates from the oats and fruit will give you the energy your body […]

Farro, Apple & Kale Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Farro, Apple & Kale Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Hello foodies! It has been a LONG time since my last post – it feels good to be back! I’ve been busy in my dietetic internship on my way to becoming a Registered Dietitian (whoo!). I’ll officially be done at the end of March, which means more blogging in the future… 😉

I recreated this recipe over the summer after a warm bike ride to a restaurant called The Commons. I ordered this farro and kale salad that was the perfect combination of chewy farro, massaged kale, and crispy apples tossed in a light apple cider vinaigrette. I quickly made notes in my phone so I could recreate it at home. I decided to go with a pomegranate vinaigrette from America’s Test Kitchen, which is AMAZING. But this salad would pair well with many dressings!

Kale has been in the “health food” spotlight for a while now – it’s nutrient dense and packed with fiber! I don’t know about you, but this nutritious green can be pretty tough when eaten raw. Massaging your kale before using it makes a WORLD of difference! Never massaged kale before? Check it out here!

FARRO, APPLE, AND KALE SALAD WITH POMEGRANATE VINAIGRETTE

Recipe inspired by a delicious salad I had at The Commons. Dressing recipe from America’s Test Kitchen The Complete Vegetarian Cookbook

Ingredients:

  • 2 apples, cut into bite-size chunks
  • 1 bunch lacinato kale (aka: dino kale, Tuscan kale)
  • 1 bunch arugula
  • 1 cup farro
  • 1/2 cup pecans
  • Goat cheese, for garnish

Vinaigrette ingredients:

  • 2 Tablespoons water
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons pomegranate molasses
  • 1 small shallot, minced
  • 1 Tablespoon honey
  • 1 Tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Directions:

  1. Rinse farro and place in a pot with 3 cups water. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer for 30 minutes. Drain off excess liquid.
  2. Meanwhile, toast pecans in the oven or in a frying pan. If toasting in the oven, spread pecans on a sheet pan and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit until slightly toasty, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. If toasting in a pan, spread pecans in an even layer on a frying pan. Place over medium heat and stir frequently. Watch them like a hawk! Once they start to brown, it will happen quickly. Remove nuts from pan to prevent further toasting.
  3. Wash, de-stem, and chop kale into bite size pieces. Massage kale until tender.
  4. Combine apples, kale, arugula, farro and pecans in a large bowl.
  5. In a small bowl, combine all vinaigrette ingredients except for the olive oil. While whisking mixture, slowly add olive olive.
  6. Add vinaigrette to salad to taste. Top with crumbled goat cheese, if desired.

Bon appetit!

Kale Flower Salad

Kale Flower Salad

“Flowers in a salad??” you might ask. These delicate, slightly sweet flowers add a pop of color and flavor to your hardy green salad. My kale plant has grown quite large in the past few years, but this is the first year that it has bloomed. […]